How to Get Your Degree Without Sacrificing Work

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College grads earn a 56% higher income in comparison to high school graduates. But with increasing inflation in tuition costs, it’s nearly impossible to afford college without simultaneously working full-time. So how do you have the best of both worlds?

The answer can be summed up in two words- online school.

Getting a degree online is more common than you think. Approximately 68% of online students are working professionals. There’s no need to commute to campus, and students are not limited by traditional class times. The flexibility is extremely attractive to workers who want to advance their careers with higher education.

If you’re restricted by your work schedule, getting your degree online may be the most practical option. Here are a few tips to help you balance online school with the demands of work.

Set Your Own Pace

Not everyone is logistically capable of a full-time commitment. Reports show that 54% of online students are only part-time. If your work life is demanding, you can plan your class load accordingly. Take note of due dates and future exams, that way you can anticipate how you can balance school with work.

Contact Instructors

Establishing relationships with your professors is crucial when you are going to school online. It may be less convenient to maintain contact without in-person lectures, but don’t underestimate the power of an email exchange or a skype call. Finding ways to get to know your professors allows you to gain networking contacts that may open up new job opportunities in the future.

Get Organized

Juggling online courses with work requires some self-discipline. If you want to improve your personal organization, keep a physical calendar and an ongoing task list. Writing out your to-do’s helps keep your tasks in order so that you can balance it all.

With the right amount of balance, it’s possible to get a degree while benefiting from the salary of a full-time job. The conveniences of online schooling eliminate your need to choose between future opportunities and present income, advancing your education without disrupting your career.